In this case, several readers have written to tell us that this article was helpful to them, earning it our reader-approved status. Do you listen to  If you need to strain to reach the mouthpiece, you may not get the right embouchure. Get your answers by asking now. ", - the bottom D pad. wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. Take it to a repair shop. I played yesterday and everything worked fine. My response: Hello Barrie, Great question. The long screw ending at this pad had come out and was not holding the pad flat when being pressed, allowing it to distort and let air out. wikiHow's. Wind instrument folks: what instrument is in this pic? Don’t forget to moisten the reed in a cup of water or with your saliva before playing it. I'm now having issues with both middle staff C# and above the staff C# playing very flat. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.
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\u00a9 2020 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. Close the corners of your mouth when you play, but keep your lips relatively loose. Why does the tune go down on my Alto when playing from C to D? please can you help me figure this out? Playing the low notes on saxophone, especially at a low volume can be a little difficult. Altissimo Fingerings for Alto Saxophone by Christopher Barrick F#3 G3 G#3 A3 1. This image is not<\/b> licensed under the Creative Commons license applied to text content and some other images posted to the wikiHow website. Only cover the tapered end of the reed with your mouth. I’m using premonado alto saxophone, but the c# has not been working and also some notes like f# octave and lots more like that. A bone-dry reed won’t play well. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.
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\u00a9 2020 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. Include your email address to get a message when this question is answered. jazz, music Black Friday starts off with whimper despite record day, No thanks: Lions fire Matt Patricia, GM Bob Quinn, How the post-election stocks rally stacks up against history, Reynolds, Lively donate $500K to charity supporting homeless. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.
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\u00a9 2020 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. Found a leaky first finger B pad!". It's better to spend a little time and money to get your saxophone fixed by a professional than to risk damaging your instrument. The lifter bar should have about 1 to 2 mm (.04 to .08 in) of space to move before it starts lifting up the octave key. I recently had it overhauled, with new pads, springs, cork and felt. wikiHow marks an article as reader-approved once it receives enough positive feedback. Thanks to all authors for creating a page that has been read 67,889 times. The bell is already munched, so this would be a perfect horn for the purpose. the bracket that holds the reed against the mouthpiece) with the wider side sitting closer to the base of the reed, then screw it securely. This trick will help you identify which section the problem may be arising from. "I bought a secondhand Trevor James alto revolution that was in pretty bad shape as a project. ", http://thevault.musicarts.com/signs-time-replace-saxophone-reeds/, consider supporting our work with a contribution to wikiHow. 1. Taking a few extra minutes to make sure you have the right grip might save you a lot of time troubleshooting! Usually, the pad that tends to stick the most on the saxophone is G-sharp(A-flat) followed by Low C-sharp (Low D-flat), E-flat (D-sharp), and then the Bis key. This is why modern saxes have a low B to C# closing arm and adjusting screw. 1. When I try to play G natural on my alto sax, it comes out a G sharp. References This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.
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\u00a9 2020 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. Don’t slide it so far into your mouth that you’re covering the curved, darker part of the reed. What do I do if my middle notes aren't sounding right on my saxophone? How do I play "middle E" on the alto saxophone? Main fingering for accessing altissimo. Whenever I blow into my Alto Sax, a sort of a whistling sound comes out. When you can, visit a repair shop to have this issue properly resolved. Additionally, if the instrument is too low or high in relation to your torso, the keys may be uncomfortable to reach. Then use another screwdriver to turn the screw over the G-sharp pad cup clockwise in small increments of about 15-degrees at a time. This means a C on the tenor = a Bb on the piano. If the cork is there but your test still results in the G-sharp pad cup opening, it may be happening because the regulation bar’s screw has come loose and needs tightening. I think my own problem is quite different from others. What do I do? {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/1\/14\/Troubleshoot-a-Saxophone-Step-1-Version-4.jpg\/v4-460px-Troubleshoot-a-Saxophone-Step-1-Version-4.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/1\/14\/Troubleshoot-a-Saxophone-Step-1-Version-4.jpg\/aid36389-v4-728px-Troubleshoot-a-Saxophone-Step-1-Version-4.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"546","licensing":"

\u00a9 2020 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.
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\u00a9 2020 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. If you don't have one you might be able to borrow from a friend who has an extra one. More stable if sax has high F# key; awkward to access higher notes. Since pads are connected using shellac, they’re difficult to remove. If a key keeps sticking, store it in your case with an old reed wedged underneath the pad cup. Did McCracken make that monolith in Utah? C-sharp is open on alto. A = C. F# = A (i.e. I play an Accent AS710L. This image is not<\/b> licensed under the Creative Commons license applied to text content and some other images posted to the wikiHow website. If your high notes make a loud squeak, check if the octave key rises when you play high D. If this occurs, carefully bend your octave key down enough so it doesn't lift when you play a high D. Be careful not to touch the pad directly otherwise you might dislodge it accidentally.

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