Otherwise you'd need to arrange it differently. Psychologists, generally speaking, will be viewed as being higher up the food chain. :) I personally want to do both if I am still motivated after turning 35 :). I will tell her to really look into both avenues. PMHNPs are in great demand in most parts of the country, especially in states where NP practice is independent. Specializes in Vents, Telemetry, Home Care, Home infusion. allnurses is a Nursing Career, Support, and News Site. Our mission is to Empower, Unite, and Advance every nurse, student, and educator. Best of luck to you and your friend! She has always been interested in mental health and plans to go back to school. Since 1997, allnurses is trusted by nurses around the globe. This is significant and is making me reconsider my enrollment in a psychologist program. Do you feel you are in demand as a PMHNP? I'd like to become an NP so that I can counsel/talk with my client, but if meds are needed, or further tests/labs are needed, I would like the ability to be able to prescribe/order them. Really, to be a Clinical Psychologist.. You'd probably have to get your PHD, which means 9+ years in school. Thanks so much for answering!! Has 1 years experience. Subspecialties: There are no formal subspecializations for psychiatric nurse practitioners. Less time in school, more money, hmm.. Our members represent more than 60 professional nursing specialties. Being a clinical psychologist requires training in research, assessment, therapy, etc....which is great, but if you aren't interested in those things, it can be a LOOOONG road. If a psychologist does this w/o having additional, verifiable training, such as completing a nutrition program, they are in violation. As far as the pay goes...that is harder to research. To me, that is an important difference. Our mission is to Empower, Unite, and Advance every nurse, student, and educator. I know people who did both and the Psych NP education is by far a better return on investment because you can prescribe. I vigorously researched the salaries, as that was the facet I was least knowledgeable about, and it appears that the psych NP gets (roughly, on average) 15k more a year than a psychologist. There are far more jobs for nurses than there are psychologists so it’s tougher, much tougher, to get into the profession. Since 1997, allnurses is trusted by nurses around the globe. If a psychologist does this w/o having additional, verifiable training, such as completing a nutrition program, they are in violation. A psych NP can prescribe and all clinical hours are obtained while in the program. If you are an RN already you may want to go the NP route. I would think a major issue is what background you bring to the table. I frankly don't have the time to pursue both degrees or I might consider doing so. No one will pay you to do therapy - there are many other (and cheaper) personnel to fill that role. allnurses is a Nursing Career, Support, and News Site. A few psych NP I know practice counseling as private practice part-time but it does not generate enough income. allnurses.com, INC, 7900 International Drive #300, Bloomington MN 55425 More medication monitering. Psychologists are primarily trained in scientific research and psychotherapy, so if you are just interested in psychotherapy then a Masters degree in psychology … I was accepted into a psych NP program but due to time and money did not go and work as a FNP instead and so have interviewed some people in field about it. Specializes in Med-Surg, Trauma, Ortho, Neuro, Cardiac. Specializes in Family Nurse Practitioner. However, I love the idea of diagnosing and prescribing as I have practiced this secretly over the years a psyche RN. Psychiatry is different from what psychiatric nurse practitioners and therapists and psychologists do because to the status as medical doctors, though many of their job responsibilities are similar. Specializes in Med-Surg, Trauma, Ortho, Neuro, Cardiac. But it is the shortest route she can take from RN degree. Doctorate degree in psychology will take minimum of 4 years followed by 1 year of internship and 1 year of fellowship. Psychologists do all kinds of therapy, psych. And as others have so well pointed out, time is everything when you have a family and everything. Not so the psychologists, whose pay is not good relative to the length of their education, … Specializes in behavioral health. Specializes in Psychiatry (PMHNP), Family (FNP). Actually, I am pursuing a Master's in Psychology: Mental Health Administration degree:yeah: and then I will also obtain my PMHNP as well. If you like the therapy, go that route but some schools are offering a psychotherapy component to the Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (PMHNP) tract. The main difference is that psychologists cannot prescribe and are in school for longer because they require a doctoral degree. forgot a crucial note that my comments are specific to California. But my heart is more with psychology. By completing my psychology PhD I will obtain the in depth counseling/therapy skills that isn't in place in the NP program, yet have the larger scope of practice offered by NP licensure. I did research, looked at education cirriculums, and talked to pscyh NPs and psychologists, and I got the overall impression that psych NPs are utilized more for medication management than for psychotherapy, although both are in their scope of practice. She thinks this wouldn't be as much patient to patient. I have close friends and colleagues who are psychologists. Additionally, you will most likely not be very well trained in therapy coming out of a PMHNP program. If your goal is to provide counseling, then perhaps psychologist is the best route. the more i look into becoming a psych-mental heath NP, i'm wondering why not just become a pyschologist...i'm not interested in RX privileges. Specializes in Vents, Telemetry, Home Care, Home infusion. However, they can work in subspecialty clinics that focus on children … they have put in years and years only to make as much as a RN and also jobs are hard to come by at least on the West Coast. Med management in combination with therapy is necessary for positive client outcomes. LOL...I am 37 and I need motivation and cash to get my Bachelors degree! 2. I would not hesitate to go the PMHNP route and I am seriously considering it myself. I contemplated the same thing...everyone told me to go the NP or CNS route, but I start my doctorate in psychology in the fall :) I did research, looked at education cirriculums, and talked to pscyh NPs and psychologists, and I got the overall impression that psych NPs are utilized more for medication management than for psychotherapy, although both are in their scope of practice. And I've been in my PhD program concurrently. I'm a pharmacology nerd so this is ok for me, but psychology might truly be a better fit for you. You must have a doctorate to sit the psychologists licensing exam, so either a PhD or PsyD. i am more interested in diagnosing & counselling...so thats what psychologists do right? It appears to me that there is not a significant difference in pay, or psych NPs are slightly better compensated. Either way, you will be in school for quite some time and then have to do additional FREE work after graduation, so there's quite some time before you will start bringing in money. I am much more interested in psychotherapy, diagnosing, and testing. An NP can also do nutritional and wellness counseling. Depending on the doctorate program you CAN do them concurrently if you're not working FT also. I'd suggest doing the NP first, so you could get out there and start working, and work on the PhD while working as a psych NP. The psychologist route is indeed a good one and provides the nurse with the therapy background which could only strengthen an NP degree as well. 1-612-816-8773. However, I ultimately think that I won't be happy doing medication management, … I am much more interested in psychotherapy, diagnosing, and testing. Psychiatrists and psychiatric nurse practitioners essentially perform the same job duties; however, some states have enacted laws that require psychiatrists to review or co-sign documents completed by psychiatric nurse practitioners. Then I go find myself a nice rural place to practice in an area where NP's have decent prescriptive permissions, and I settle down as the "local practicioner" and live happily ever after, getting help on my ungodly student loans and taking copayments in zuccini and puppies. I'm not a psychologist, so I am just answering this from my perspective. It's not like psychologists work for beans. There are a few paid positions and assistantships, but they are very few and far between and very competitive. You know, we as nurses are so well-rounded in our studies and are becoming increasingly more educated and independent, :redbeathe thank the Good Lord above!! I want to be a a MHNP as well and was wondering if it was within the scope of practice of this APN to do long term, short term, aor any counseling. Edited Jan 9, 2011 by kcocat It is true that, from my experience, psych nurse practitioner mainly do medication management.

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